Friday, June 29, 2012

Tokyo Farmers Markets: June 30th and July 1st

Nakajima-san's Niigata mochi at Nippori Farmers Market



















It seems impossible that we arrive in the land of July on Sunday, but there's no denying the evidence presented by weather, exuberant vegetables at the farm, and long hours of sunlight. July it is, indeed. And Tokyo farmers markets continue with a small handful this weekend to choose from, but plenty more to come in the month ahead. Start looking for edamame, tomatoes, potatoes, and other items galore as the days wear on and the heat makes you think about wilting. Hide behind your green curtain with a tall glass of umehachimitsu and savor the season's harvest!


Every Saturday and Sunday in June
A massive weekend affair that is great fun and features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Plus, a curry I served up by one of the vendors was plate-licking good. (I refrained, but only just.)
10am to 4pm

Every Saturday in June
visit to this market is well worth the trip for the number of organic growers and getting to meet a Tokyo farmer from just down the tracks in Kokobunji.
10am to 2pm

Every Saturday and Sunday in June
Another nice market not far from the sumo stadium in Ryogoku. It's worth casing out for the neighborhood as well as the vendors.
11am to 5pm
Map

Yurakucho Farmer's Market
Every Saturday and Sunday in June
Another great market somewhere in size between Kichijoji and the United Nation's University Farmer's Market, it often features from a particular growing region as well as heaps of farmers and producers from nearby Chiba and Saitama, too.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of the station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout and we'll add it to the list!

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Udo: The Story of More Odd but Tasty Food from Japan



Living in a foreign culture sometimes means eating things that look completely unfamiliar. It is both an unnerving and an exhilarating experience. More often than not I find myself loving this new dish and flavor, and a perfect case in point is udo (Aralia cordata). One of Japan's many sansai (mountain vegetables), udo is a spring favorite that's just being pushed out now by summer fare.

The farmers, Takashi-san and C-chan, introduced me to it during a visit to a neighborhood izakaya (a Japanese tavern) one evening. I was so enthralled with the texture and flavor (good crunch with a tiny bit of ginger-esque zip) that they showed me where to find it locally and gave me a recipe while we worked in the eggplant field the next morning. Suffice it to say, I decided to share this weird looking yet tasty vegetable discovery with readers over at eco+waza. Give it a read and mark your calendar for next years eating delight!

Monday, June 25, 2012

Guest Post: Strawberry Season


Savoring the strawberry season - oh, yeah!
















I was lucky enough to meet Dona Bumgarner during the course of the 2012 Blogathon. She writes of her experience and reflections on being a mother and a gardener at Aubergine. Today she shares her thoughts on raising a child with a taste for seasonal fare. Enjoy!

Oh, and you can see what I wrote about finding inspiration here, there, and everywhere over at her blog!

My daughter's first solid food was a yellow nectarine. I was eating it while I walked around the farmer's market on a hot August afternoon last summer and she rode on my chest in her Ergo carrier.

I didn't think she was paying attention to what I was eating until she reached up and plucked the fruit from my hand just as I was about to take a bite. She was six months old and had four teeth by then, but she wasn't really interested in food for nourishment yet.

She gripped it in both hands and held it to her mouth, sucking the juice and exploring the texture with her tongue. She loved it. There was no way I was going to get that nectarine back from her.

Our family is lucky to live on the central coast of California where the mild weather allows a usually long growing season and where organic farming practices are the norm rather than the exception. We have several year-round farmer's markets to choose from and more that run during the height of the growing season.

Our decision to eat locally-produced food came from a desire to reduce our carbon footprint as well as to invest in our own local economy. The unexpected benefit is that we eat mostly fruits and vegetables that are in season. Studies have shown that eating this way is best for our health, but we do it because it feels - and tastes! - really good.

Have you ever eaten a tomato straight off the vine in July, warm from the sun and bursting with juice? Compare that to eating one of the bland and unnaturally bright red tomatoes from the supermarket in December and you will understand what I mean.

During the first year my daughter was an eater I introduced her to new foods as they came into season. She mouthed the last of the stone fruits last summer. We ate slices of pear in the fall and I roasted winter squashes cut into large chunks that she could hold herself. In winter we discovered she loved mandarin oranges and my avkolemeno soup with the tang of lemon, but can't stand the texture of an avocado.

She learned how to use her new teeth to scrape clean the leaf of an artichoke when they were plentiful in January, and ate tender steamed asparagus spears by holding them in her fist like a breadstick in February. In March she samples fresh sweet peas straight from the pod in her grandmother's garden and in April she tried her first strawberry.

That first berry came from Windmill Farms. This Dutch farmer has land in the middle of an urban neighborhood and grows the best strawberries I've ever eaten. They are small and sweet and deep red all the way through. He sells out every week, even though he arrives with a tower of berry flats that seem endless.

I squatted down in front of her stroller with my prized basket of berries and offered her one. She took it from my hand and turned it over, examaning it. It was shiny and plump and a delicious shade of red. She took a tiny bite and raised her eyebrows like she does when she's excited about something. The she mashed the whole berry into her mouth and bit down so the juice ran down her chin. She chewed and swallowed and signed emphatically, "More, more!"

This is the kind of eater I want to raise: One who loves good food and understands where it comes from. One who will pick cherry tomatoes with me from the garden in July. One who will visit the market with me each week and get to know the farmers. One who will be excited for the best peaches when they come ripe in August and pick wild blackberries for jam in the last days of summer.

One who will sit with me on the curb on a sunny April day and gorge on the season's first perfectly ripe strawberries until red juice runs down both of our chins.

Leave a comment and tell me about your family's favorite seasonal treats.

Doña Bumgarner is a writer, mom, and gardener.  She is currently loving the bustle of the summer market and sunny days in the garden with her toddler. You can find her musings on motherhood in midlife, among other things, on her blog, Aubergine.


Friday, June 22, 2012

Tokyo Farmers Markets: June 23rd and 24th


Yummy veg at Roppongi Farmers Market!
Unseasonable typhoons and lots of rain make this one of the more remarkable springs we've experienced yet since arriving in Tokyo. Don't be daunted by the weather, though, as vegetables carry right on doing what they do best in this weather: growing to perfection. Growers and producers will be glad to see you, and you won't regret for a moment the journey to find fresh carrots (just coming out of the ground now!), some of the first edamame, and heavenly green beans. Put on your galoshes and get out the door already!

Gyre Market
Saturday, June 23 and Sunday, June 24
A gem of a market hidden away in one of Tokyo's high-end shopping districts offering seasonal favorites in a way that feels homey yet rather boutique-y.
11am to 5pm

Every Saturday and Sunday in June
A massive weekend affair that is great fun and features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Plus, the curry I had during my last visit from one of the vendors was plate-licking good. (I refrained, but only just.)
10am to 4pm

Every Saturday in June
A recent first visit to this market was well worth the trip for the number of organic growers and getting to meet a Tokyo farmer from just down the tracks in Kokobunji.
10am to 2pm

Every Saturday and Sunday in June
Another nice market not far from the sumo stadium in Ryogoku it's worth casing out for the neighborhood as well as the vendors.
11am to 5pm
Map

Yurakucho Farmer's Market
Every Saturday and Sunday in June
Another great market somewhere in size between Kichijoji and the United Nation's University Farmer's Market, it often features from a particular growing region as well as heaps of farmers and producers from nearby Chiba and Saitama, too.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of the station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout and we'll add it to the list!

Monday, June 18, 2012

Zucchini Ginger Marmalade
















If there is one thing that can be said for tsuyu (rainy season) is that it is good for canning. Fruits and vegetables so eagerly drink up all that water that they are near to bursting in their eagerness to get off the vine. These days we're gathering zucchini twice a day, and that's saying something. C-chan recently lamented a missed round of collecting as she held an over-sized (by Japanese standards) round green zucchini in her hands.

"I can't sell this," she said with a laugh and a shake of her head as a few sprinkles landed around us.

"It's American sized!" I joked in an effort to make her feel better, and she promptly gave it to me. I wasn't quite expecting that, although I should know by now that such comments will get me more than I bargained for, i.e. my sushi lesson during our first year.

So, home I came with two rather beastly fellows, along with a bundle of rhubarb to share with a friend and for a next round of rhubarb butter. One zucchini went to neighbors who religiously share their compost, but the fate of the other wasn't yet clear to me. It was time to peruse the recipe books and see what inspiration I could find.















A recipe for Gingered Zucchini Marmalade in the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving is what got my mouth-watering. (This is the same book where I found the pickled octopus eggplant recipe last winter.) Ginger is a household favorite as is marmalade. Seemed like a no-brainer. Yet, the recipe called for some rather complicated sounding efforts with the fruit - separating pith from peel, fruity flesh from pith, and so on - which I promptly decided to ignore. Pith and peel add pectin, and that meant I could skip the out-of-season apple. (That's the logic I used, anyway.) I also switched out the two lemons for an extra Japanese mikan and threw in one of the new citrus I met at the Roppongi Farmers Market last month. (Kiyomi's the name with a flavor somewhere between grapefruit, yuzu, and mikan. Super yummy. I'm almost sorry to see it in the marmalade it was so good fresh.) The result are twelve jars - 11 small Japanese-sized jars and one American half-pint - of golden marmalade that is sweet, tangy, and gingery-zippy.

Tokyo Farm Zucchini Ginger Marmalade
5 cups grated, peeled zucchini
4 citrus, cut thinly, seeds removed
4 cups sugar
3 Tablespoons ginger, peeled and grated
1 cup orange juice
1 cup water

Peel and grate the zucchini and plop into the pot. Thinly slice the citrus and remove seeds before sending them to the pot. Peel and grate the ginger and toss it in, too. Mix in the sugar, orange juice, and water and bring to a boil covered. Simmer for about 30 minutes while getting jars, lids, and the rest of the gear in place. When the mixture gels on the spoon and the jars have boiled well, load hot marmalade into hot jars, wipe the rim, and affix lids. Process for 10 minutes.

Caveats
Ginger - I'd seriously add more next time. I might even replace a portion of the grated zucchini with ginger just to see what will happen come December when it's ready to come out of hibernation. Oh, yes.

Apple - The apple is most likely a pectin inducer, but it also occurred to me that it may have been to create more 'space' between the grated zucchini bits. Dense items like pumpkin or mashed potatoes are forbidden items to can (unless cubed and in a pressure canner) for their low-acidity and the challenge of heating the center of the jar to the temperature required to kill nasty things that cause food poisoning. I might be putting that back in or adding another citrus to further raise the acidity and still give space.

Friday, June 15, 2012

Tokyo Farmers Markets: June 16th and 17th

Kazuto Tameike of Kanjyuka Orchards
Well, it's raining for sure, but let's put this in perspective.

The vegetables will be cleaner by the time you get them home. Rain like this makes cucumbers and tomatoes so exuberant to be harvested they start leaping off their respective plants almost faster than farmers can haul them in. Fewer customers mean plenty of time to peruse and chat about a new recipe, too. I see only benefits resulting from some damp shoes and a steamy train ride. Do consider a waterproof shopping bag, though.


Sunday, June 17
11am to 5pm
A nice sized market held on the terrace just in front of Ebisu Garden Place that will always be special to me for introducing me to dried natto and tea seedpods.

Nippori Farmer's Market
Saturday, June 16 and Sunday, June 17
10am to 5pm
Another great market in the city found with a little help from friends, this one is sure to not disappoint. My first visit was wonderful despite cold temperatures and a smattering of rain. Plus, Tohoku growers are on hand sharing their best-of-the-best, so come on out to be part of the recovery and get something good to eat.
No map, but just head out the east exit and look for the green awnings!

Koenji Farmer's Market
Saturday, June 16
A new market I spotted while riding the train on a Saturday morning into the city center. That circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre could only mean one thing! Sure enough, I found a small group of area growers and producers (plus a booth of folks from Niigata) and got a tour of the theatre.
11am - 5pm
Map

Saturday, June 16
A unique event in the heart of the city that a vegetable loving geek like me wouldn't miss for the world. What better way to get the healthy vitamins and minerals you need to sustain an evening of karaoke and izakaya hopping?
8pm - ?

Kichijoji Market
Saturday, June 16 and Sunday, June 17
A terrific two days of seasonal vegetables, fruits, homemade treats, and even some fun activities for those whipper-snappers!
10am to 5pm
Map

Sunday, June 17
I could go wax on forever about how great this market is and how important it is for the future of Japanese farming. Instead, I'll just insist that folks go and see for themselves what great things the market and these innovative growers are doing.
10am to 4pm, Rain or shine!


Every Saturday and Sunday in May
A massive weekend affair that is great fun and features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Plus, the curry I had during my last visit from one of the vendors was plate-licking good. (I refrained, but only just.)
10am to 4pm

Every Saturday in May
A recent first visit to this market was well worth the trip for the number of organic growers and getting to meet a Tokyo farmer from just down the tracks in Kokobunji.
10am to 2pm

Every Saturday and Sunday in May
Another nice market not far from the sumo stadium in Ryogoku it's worth casing out for the neighborhood as well as the vendors.
11am to 5pm
Map

Yurakucho Farmer's Market
Every Saturday and Sunday in May
Another great market somewhere in size between Kichijoji and the United Nation's University Farmer's Market, it often features from a particular growing region as well as heaps of farmers and producers from nearby Chiba and Saitama, too.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of the station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout and we'll add it to the list!

Monday, June 11, 2012

A Break in the Rain


Yama ichigo pre-devourment
The rain stopped yesterday long enough for us to haul the futons out into the sun, and then grab two good friends and head west into the mountains. My head is swimming at the moment with writing assignments, new responsibilities at old jobs, and trying to figure out my next step. A mountain trek full of steep inclines, smells of damp cedar, views of distant ranges, and a fair amount of sweat sounded perfect.

Stick bug or tobinanafushi.
And it was. I can't say I found answers or got any writing done, but it was a perfect day that regrounded me some. Plus, it reminded me that I better get off my duff and start training for our trip to Hokkaido this August. Oof.

Oh, and I should mention this is the same hike where I found charcoal for sale. This time I bought a bag!


Cool plant along trail. Know it?




Friday, June 8, 2012

Tokyo Farmers Markets: June 9th and 10th

Kosaka Farm at the Roppongi Market in June!
A short list of markets this weekend, but don't let that put you off in the slightest. Hit the markets before the rainy season begins in earnest and be sure to pack an umbrella in case it decides to pour while you're there. Gather up some of the last of the spring vegetables and sample some of the first tastes of summer, too!
Saturday, June 9 and Sunday, June 10
A gem of a market hidden away in one of Tokyo's high-end shopping districts offering seasonal favorites in a way that feels homey yet rather boutique-y.
11am to 5pm

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday in May
A massive weekend affair that is great fun and features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Plus, the curry I had during my last visit from one of the vendors was plate-licking good. (I refrained, but only just.)
10am to 4pm

Every Saturday in May
A recent first visit to this market was well worth the trip for the number of organic growers and getting to meet a Tokyo farmer from just down the tracks in Kokobunji.
10am to 2pm

Every Saturday and Sunday in May
Another nice market not far from the sumo stadium in Ryogoku it's worth casing out for the neighborhood as well as the vendors.
11am to 5pm
Map

Yurakucho Farmer's Market
Every Saturday and Sunday in May
Another great market somewhere in size between Kichijoji and the United Nation's University Farmer's Market, it often features from a particular growing region as well as heaps of farmers and producers from nearby Chiba and Saitama, too.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of the station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout and we'll add it to the list!

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Vinegar Article at Eco+Waza

Vinegar has long been a favorite item in my household. Invaluable in the kitchen for pickling and homemade salad dressings, it is also a very helpful cleaner. Possessing a naturally high acidity, vinegar gives mold and mildew a run for their money and makes a good basic disinfectant, too, that isn't harmful to the environment. Check out my article over at Eco+Waza for the full scoop, and then start using it in more places you thought possible!

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Potatoes Blooming

Blue potato blossom
It was until I visited the Nippori Farmers Market that I remembered how good a potato could taste. Wandering among the stalls there I spotted a grower from Hokkaido selling red, pink, and yellow varieties. In Michigan I'd grown blue ones in a tower for their color as much as for their flavor, and was delighted to see them again. I bought a bag of each kind, and we feasted heartily over the next week.

Somehow in our feeding frenzy, though, I managed to save back one of each for planting in the garden. I cut them in half aiming for a larger crop, and set them in the lasagna bed. Little shoots were already pushing out from an assortment of eyes, which meant they hadn't been treated with a non-sprouting chemical. Still, I worried a bit until I saw the first dark purple shoots emerging from the soil to find the sun. Interplanted with dill, fennel and chamomile to attract predators and pollinators alike that end of the row is a miniature forest of leaves and blooms. My mouth is watering at the thought of Maan's potato salad with some of the bergamont from the west wall bed. I'm also dreaming of another cold soup recipe using that damned mint, but all in due time. For now, I'll just enjoy the flowers.


Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Milking the Watermelons


Tokyo's hot and humid summers present the perfect atmosphere for growing tomatoes, peppers, and a wide variety of vegetables. The trouble is, though, it is also the ideal atmosphere for powdery mildew. The bane of our farm and my garden, along with aphids, powdery mildew tends to attack the cucurbit crops without compunction. My first year on the farm we grew watermelons and squash, but powdery mildew settled in and essentially ruined both crops. Zucchini, thankfully, comes and goes so quickly that the spores don't have much time to attack it.

Last year for the first time in years the farmers planted a tentative row of cucumbers to see what might happen. Beautifully trellised and tended, we reaped a very nice crop and they found enough inspiration to plant at least three rows this year. Two rows of squash have also been added to the mix, and so far blooms and young fruit alike look good.

Milk drops on watermelon leaves.
In my own garden, I opted for watermelon rather than squash this year. Watermelon is one of my favorite summer fruits ever, and while I enjoyed the squash of years past I really like watermelon. It's interplanted with sweet corn (another first for me) in a nod to the American triumvirate of corn, beans, and squash. The beans are just next door in the same row and happily blooming. So far, everyone looks good here, too.

But, to be frank, I'm a little worried. Powdery mildew is lurking out there. I'm also still a little worried about my soil. I'm not entirely sure I've given my plants the best growing medium possible for assorted reasons, so I am concerned that perhaps they are not strong enough to withstand an attack. Weekly dousings of a homemade organic nutrient solution are helping, but I still found myself lying awake at night fussing. (I know. Get a life, right?)

Then I remembered something that Michael Phillips wrote in The Holistic Orchard. He cited studies done in Australia and Brazil where milk sprayed on crops at a 10% solution effectively reduced the occurrence of powdery mildew. Phillips writes that calcium inhibits fungal spore germination, in this case Sphaerotheca fuliginea, while others suggest that the naturally occurring salts and fats in milk may also play a role in slowing the fungus' spread.

Phillips recommends using whey, a by-product of the cheese-making process, which often comes free or nearly so, and like milk, is benign in the environment. Farmers in New Zealand reportedly used milk fresh from the cow, while others experimented with skim milk. Wagner Bettiol, the Brazilian scientist behind the research, used whey as well as milk in his experiments.

For my part, I used whole milk bought at the grocery store at something close to the recommended 10-percent solution in my watering can. A spray bottle would be ideal, but I decided to opt for the simplest solution at hand. It does mean the underside of the leaves was missed, but I'm hopeful that enough will be absorbed to make it worthwhile. This paired with good plant spacing and plans for future trimming to ensure air flow should help stave off disease problems over the course of the summer. Here's hoping for a watermelon rich summer!

Monday, June 4, 2012

Doggy Bag Flats

Leftovers, in some ways, are not very Japanese. It's often about fresh food made on the spot, and often right in front of the diner just after they order. This post, though, covers the first trickle of a new trend: doggy bags. It first appeared at Greenz on October 20th, 2010.

Eco-conscious diners and locavores now have a solution for their restaurant leftovers. Reusable food boxes make it possible to have a clean plate without over-stuffing yourself. Reliable companions for reusable chopsticks, "doggy boxes" cut down on food waste as well as ensure something tasty for tomorrow's bento.

Ranging in size and shape, Doggy Bag Flats come two or three in a package in varied designs. Available in trendy colors and patterns (one even by Benetton!), the boxes simplify (and beautify) the idea of toting home a few treats. Customers can also choose more potent messages - boxes with Mottainai defined or basic statistics about food waste in japan - to make it easy to let other diners know why they're tucking away those last bits on their plates.

Creators of this eco-concept in Japan, the Doggy Bag Committee, see it as an effective means of reducing Japan's food waste (equal to roughly the same amount as the country's food aid or five to nine million tons) destined to become animal feed, fertilizer, or incinerator fuel. Endorsed by Food Action Nipon, these washable, reusable, educational (and rather adorable) containers are made from one sheet of paper to stave off leaks and are themselves biodegradable. Brilliant if you ask me.

Friday, June 1, 2012

Tokyo Farmers Markets: June


BioFarm at the Earth Day Market in May!




















June brings the rainy season, and marks the first tentative steps into summer. Green curtains and gardens of all shapes and sizes are sprouting everywhere, and Tokyo's farmer's markets are a good place to begin exploring where to find the best of seasonal treats and other goodies. Check out the listing below, mark your calendar, and head out the door. Look forward to seeing you there!

Saturday, June 2
11am to 3pm
A once-a-month outreach effort by the students running a neighborhood grocery featuring fruits and vegetables from independent farmers.
Map

Sunday, June 3 and Sunday, June 17
11am to 5pm
A nice sized market held on the terrace just in front of Ebisu Garden Place that will always be special to me for introducing me to dried natto and tea seedpods.
Saturday, June 9 and Sunday, June 10
Saturday, June 23 and Sunday, June 24
A gem of a market hidden away in one of Tokyo's high-end shopping districts offering seasonal favorites in a way that feels homey yet rather boutique-y.
11am to 5pm

Nippori Farmer's Market
Saturday, June 2
10am to 5pm
Another great market in the city found with a little help from friends, this one is sure to not disappoint. My first visit was wonderful despite cold temperatures and a smattering of rain. Plus, Tohoku growers are on hand sharing their best-of-the-best, so come on out to be part of the recovery and get something good to eat.
No map, but just head out the east exit and look for the green awnings!

Koenji Farmer's Market
Saturday, June 16
A new market I spotted while riding the train on a Saturday morning into the city center. That circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre could only mean one thing! Sure enough, I found a small group of area growers and producers (plus a booth of folks from Niigata) and got a tour of the theatre. A full write-up coming up soon!
11am - 5pm
Map


Saturday, June 16
A unique event in the heart of the city that a vegetable loving geek like me wouldn't miss for the world. What better way to get the healthy vitamins and minerals you need to sustain an evening of karaoke and izakaya hopping?
8pm - ?


Kichijoji Market
Saturday, June 16 and Sunday, June 17
A terrific two days of seasonal vegetables, fruits, homemade treats, and even some fun activities for those whipper-snappers!
10am to 5pm
Map


Sunday, June 17
I could go wax on forever about how great this market is and how important it is for the future of Japanese farming. Instead, I'll just insist that folks go and see for themselves what great things the market and these innovative growers are doing.
10am to 4pm, Rain or shine!


Every Saturday and Sunday in May
A massive weekend affair that is great fun and features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Plus, the curry I had during my last visit from one of the vendors was plate-licking good. (I refrained, but only just.)
10am to 4pm

Every Saturday in May
A recent first visit to this market was well worth the trip for the number of organic growers and getting to meet a Tokyo farmer from just down the tracks in Kokobunji.
10am to 2pm

Every Saturday and Sunday in May
Another nice market not far from the sumo stadium in Ryogoku it's worth casing out for the neighborhood as well as the vendors.
11am to 5pm
Map

Yurakucho Farmer's Market
Every Saturday and Sunday in May
Another great market somewhere in size between Kichijoji and the United Nation's University Farmer's Market, it often features from a particular growing region as well as heaps of farmers and producers from nearby Chiba and Saitama, too.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of the station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout and we'll add it to the list!