Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from September, 2013

Tokyo Farmers Markets: Saturday, September 21st and Sunday, September 22nd

Tanabata celebrations at the Sendai Morning Market. Another brilliant line-up of markets this weekend as September steadily rolls its way along to cooler temperatures. Find all you need and then some for all your seasonal fare desires, including those you weren't aware of until arrival at the market! Ebisu Market Sunday, September 22nd and 29th Making up for missing last month apparently, the Ebisu Market is rocking it four (yes, four!) times this month. Don't miss the opportunity to head to a nifty part of the city where on these sweet Sundays you'll find farmers and producers galore. (One even comes from Okutama with a lovely array of vegetables and a vegetable-based spread that will knock your socks off.) Don't miss it! 11am to 5pm Map Earth Day Market Sunday, September 22nd I could go wax on forever about how great this market is and how important it is for the future of Japanese farming. Instead, I'll just insist that folks go and see for

Tokyo's Farmers Markets: Saturday, September 14th and Sunday, September 15th

Dancing vegetable marquis at the Sendai Morning Market. This weekend is as full of farmers market options as ever! A wide selection of markets means an excellent selection of great growers and producers to meet, talk with, and buy from right here in the city. Find your seasonal fare and then some while I'm wandering about in Hokkaido . I'll be jealous, but back on the scene later this month. Meanwhile, meet, greet, and eat! Gyre Market Saturday,  September 14th and Sunday, September 15th (Probably.*) A gem of a market hidden away in one of Tokyo's high-end shopping districts offering seasonal favorites in a way that feels homey yet rather boutique-y. 11am to 5pm Map *The Gyre Market schedule and Facebook page remain outdated. I've got messages out to the organizers, and will update as I hear. Nippori Farmer's Market Saturday, September 14th and Sunday, September 15th 10am to 5pm Another great market in the city found with a little help fr

Thursday Snapshot: Dancing Vegetables at Sendai's Morning Market

I've been wanting to go to Sendai's morning market since we took a trip there two years ago. A few blocks from the station and tucked in a side street, it is an absolute delight. While we wandered about admiring and sampling seasonal local fare (try the shiso wrapped onigiri with sweet miso inside) the vegetables started dancing on the marquis. Seriously. Here's the video of what followed in the market's little Tanabata festival.

September Farmers Markets in Tokyo

Yukiko Ishigaki of Suzuya, an awesome beanery, at the Sendai Morning Market. September heralds the beginning of autumn with its torrent of typhoons , the planting of winter vegetables , and the gradual arrival of new crops. Chestnuts , sweet potatoes , and togarashi (hot peppers) join the squash already on the scene. The first rice of the year should be hitting the tables, too, this month, which is always exciting. (I'm looking forward to duck with mine!) Tomatoes and corn are winding down, but eggplant will be running strong until November. Oh, my stomach is already growling and I've not even touched on apples and nashi (Japanese pears) . Ebisu Market Sunday, September 1st, 8th,  22nd, and 29th Making up for missing last month apparently, the Ebisu Market is rocking it four (yes, four!) times this month. Don't miss the opportunity to head to a nifty part of the city where on these sweet Sundays you'll find farmers and producers galore. (One even comes from O

Thursday Snapshot: Buddha and the Butterfly

Toudaiji, Nara Park Nara Park may be full of tourists and deer, but there is no denying the grandeur and beauty of the buildings there. Not least among these is Toudaiji with its magnificent Buddha. Even though I have visited him a number of times I never tire of his face. Or the friendly butterfly that graces the  pot of lotus blooming near him.

Exergy House article up at Ecotowaza!

A suido (small canal) where edible plants and animals live filters water at Amekaze House. The first time I really thought and wrote about sustainable building practices was after a visit to Square One . Our friends, Toby and Maiko Weymiller, held a straw-bale building workshop that another friend suggested we join. I was fascinated by the ideas and the people I met there. Since then I've looked around at the world with new eyes and other friends have put me on the scent of other great ideas. Such is the case with the Amekaze House in Koganei. Reina Otsuka, chief leader and motivator at Ecotowaza , asked if I would attend a tour of the house and write about it. It was extraordinary, and again I'm seeing the world with new eyes. You can read the first part of the article over at Ecotowaza and then check out the next part on Friday, September 6th. Amazing.