Monday, May 28, 2018

Review of Just Enough by Azby Brown

My somewhat-worn copy on my desk.

Admittedly, Just Enough: Lessons in Living Green from Traditional Japan by Azby Brown has been out since 2009, but like the ideas it offers up, it remains as relevant as the day it hit the shelves. I have reviewed it in a couple of different places, but a recent conversation over at Urban Farming Tokyo had me digging the book out once more and my reviews. Here's a fresh look at this unique and thoughtful book.

As climate change makes steady headway resulting in increasing economic disparity and a fiery mix of political turmoils, Azby Brown asks us to take a moment to look back to find the solutions. In Just Enough, Brown takes readers on an intimate tour of Edo Period Japan (1603-1898) where, shortly after a stint of environmental and economic crisis, the country entered a time of unprecedented economic and environmental stability.

Divided into three sections - Field and Forest, The Sustainable City, and A Life of Restraint - with two parts each, Just Enough literally takes readers on a tour of distinct parts of Edo society. In the first part of each section, we are travelers with Brown, our very able and informative guide, on a walk to Edo (Tokyo's former name) from the rural areas. We explore each setting (rural, urban Edo, and the samurai home); witness the activities of everyone from farmers to carpenters to villagers, townspeople to tradesmen; and wander through homes temples, and shops all while getting a feel for community life. Vibrant descriptions accompanied by detailed sketches and diagrams introduce daily practices, designs, materials and systems.

The second half of each section shows how these same principles and methods can be incorporated into modern life. Some require grand infrastructure rethinking (remove highways from above waterways) to cultural shifts (leave room for public foraging). Others focus on personal activities (grow a green curtain) as well as design (graywater resuse plumbing) to name just a few. Brown leaves few stones unturned and gives readers plenty of good ideas to think about.

For Edoko, or 'children of Edo' as former residents referred to themselves, such careful management of resources resulted in a vibrant economy. Tinkerers found ample work repairing everything from ceramics to metal tools. Carpenters not only built but dismantled buildings and then reused the components in new projects. Public baths made efficient use of water and fuel while offering a place where community members gathered to talk. Food vendors also made good use of fuel by cooking large quantities for sale to supplement evening meals. Many of these traditions - public baths and the daily purchasing of prepared foods - carry on today.

Just Enough is a perfect example of how the past can inform the present, how traditional technologies and mindsets can provide answers to modern problems. People, writes Brown, "...overcame many of the identical problems that confront us today - issues of energy, water, materials, food, and population." Brown's detailed picture of life in Edo and how sustainable principles were incorporated into daily to create a high standard of living is as inspiring and thought-provoking as it is engaging.

Friday, May 25, 2018

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, May 27 and Sunday, May 28

Good stuff at the UNU Market!

The final weekend of May promises to be good weather for farmers-marketing and planting. Don't miss these lovely markets and the chance to pick up something grand for dinner or even for potting up for the season. I'll be at one of these or knee-deep in my own garden trying to do a little catch-up work after the usual fantastic time in Soma and a busy week of work. It always feels good to reconnect with growers and producers as well as my own tomato plants. See you at the market!

Kamome Marche
Saturday, May 27
Set on the upper level of the Yokohama Bay Quarter, this little market offers nice variety given its size. Vendors from Yamanashi, Yokohama, and other parts of Kanagawa brave the steady ocean breeze and offer everything up from fruit to wine to fresh vegetables.
11am - 5pm
Map

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Osonbashi Marche
*This appears to be on hold for the moment. I'll update as I find out when it will happen again.
This new market in Yokohama is one I have only seen a poster and website for, but not been to yet. The venue should be beautiful, and I have no doubt the offerings will be good. Keep in mind that it is relatively new, so it might be small. However, markets don't get bigger and better if you don't go to them and support the people there. I can't go this month, but I'd love to hear from anyone who does!
10:30am to 3:30pm
Nihon-Oodoori Station
Look for the exit for the International Ferry Passenger Terminal and follow the signs.

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Rolled Up Rice Seedlings


View from the top of rolled up seedlings making their way to Chiba for a tambo art project!

This year we participated once again in the Tambo Art Project in Soma. It really is such an amazing experience. There is just about nothing better than gathering with others to set seedlings in a field. It always feels like barely controlled chaos, but the pleasure of the work, the laughter, and the people we meet there each year makes it one of the most satisfying experiences ever.

Rolled up and ready to ride for a tambo art project in Chiba.

Some people we see each year, and others are new. We all work together, and by the end we are all pretty much equally muddy. The hot bath afterwards is always the best medicine for getting dirt out from under fingernails and ensuring that muscles aren't quite so sore the next day. The barbecue at Endo-san's home is always, always, always one of the loveliest events with great food and hilarity.

View from the top.
We also tour the Exclusion Zone around the power plant as a reminder of what happened and why this project is so important. The people of Tohoku need to know that they are not forgotten or dismissed or left to fend for themselves. They also need to have their story told. It isn't just the story of the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, but their efforts at recovery and change. It is their activism and determination to rebuild and put up a fight that will benefit us all that needs to be recognized and supported. The disaster may feel like it's over for the rest of us, but for them it is part of their everyday life. They don't like it (who would?), but they keep on because to be passive in the face of it all is not acceptable.

Want to join? Check out their website (English available) for future events.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

My article on Jon Walsh at Japan Today

Jon Walsh at Social Innovation Japan in April.

I had the pleasure of meeting Jon Walsh at a Social Innovation Japan event not so long ago, and I found his work on greening Tokyo the edible way to be of great interest. He and those who set seeds and pot up plants at his recommendation have their work cut out for them, but it is exciting stuff.

Perhaps, most importantly, it is also hopeful, for as he says at the end of our chat: "Every step in the process of sharing the importance of producing and sharing real food is important, because small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world."

Read the full interview over at Japan Today and get inspired!

Friday, May 18, 2018

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, May 19 and Sunday, May 20

Mercato at the UNU Farmers Market with tasty veg!

Summer appears to have arrived, ushering in potato blossoms and popcorn seedlings in my garden. I can only hope that the tomatoes and basil will soon follow suit to grace our table. The good news is that farmers markets will be full of delightful summer veg this weekend, which will make whichever one you choose a delightful adventure. I will be up in Soma helping plant rice, so get out there and have some fun for me!

Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho Asaichi
Sunday, May 20
Early birds on Tokyo's west side should count themselves lucky to find this little market in the warren of shops just north of the station. While fruits and veg are a bit lacking, the market is big on craftsmen and women doing interesting work, excellent baked goods, miso, rice, and other tasty treats. It's worth noting that a number of places offer breakfast deals in the market!
Look for my review in Outdoor Japan's Spring Traveler!
7am - 10am

Koenji Farmers Market
Saturday, May 19*
Spotted a handful of years ago while riding the Chuo Line, this little market is still going strong. A circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre marks the spot where friendly folks with good food and interesting stories await.
*A wee bit of a best guess here as they haven't updated their blog yet. Do check before making the trip over there.
11am - 6pm
Map

Nippori Farmers Market
Saturday, May 19 and Sunday, May 20
This charming market in the heart of old Tokyo abounds with a sense of community and friendliness as well as good food. Small but lively, particularly on Saturday, it features a monthly geographical theme although regular vendors include Tohoku growers and some of the best steamed manju in the world.
No map, but just head out the East Exit and look for the green awnings
10am to 5pm

Yokohama Kitanaka Marche
Saturday, May 19 and Sunday, May 20
One of the best markets going in the Yokohama area, and it's perhaps no coincidence that they are only moments away from Baird Beer's Bashamichi Taproom. Started by the same folks who created the Market of the Sun, the Kitanaka Marche to be growing steadily with tasty offerings of fresh seasonal veg, fruit, baked goods and preserves. Read my other review over at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine for the full scoop.
10am to 4pm
Bashamichi Station, Exit 2*
Note that the market has moved, so come out of the station, turn right, and take the next right turn. Keep walking past the construction site and keep an eye out for the white tents running along next to the river.

Earth Day Market
Sunday, May 20
I could wax on forever about how great this market is and how important it is for the future of Japanese farming and global food security. However, I'll just insist that folks go and see for themselves what great things the market and these innovative growers are doing. Come find some good food and fun!
10am to 4pm, Rain or shine
Map

Oiso Farmers Market
Sunday, May 20
This little gem of a community shindig is one of the best things going outside of the Earth Day Market. Started a handful of years ago, it blossomed into a full-on monthly festival that just happens to feature Shonan area produce in its fresh, seasonal form as well as pickled, dried, and prepared-hot-in-a-bowl varieties. In summer, it transforms into a night market, while year-round a much smaller version takes place every Saturday. Lee's Bread alone is worth the journey. Read my full review at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine.
10am to 2pm
Oiso Port Building

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, May 11, 2018

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, May 12 and Sunday, May 13

Daisuke Katsumata of Umaimameya and cheerful assistant at the UNU Farmers Market.

Golden Week festivities are finished, and the weather is inching its way toward summer. A bit of rain this past week to keep us on our toes, but seeds and seedlings surely appreciated it. Early onions should be appearing, and strawberries should also still be kicking it in this part of the country. There's still time to plant your own, too, so look for seeds and seedlings at the various markets to get you started. As they say, if not now, when will you start growing delicious fun for yourself? See you at the market!

Market of the Sun

Saturday, May 12 and Sunday, May 13
One of Tokyo's newer markets, Market of the Sun (a.k.a. Taiyo Marche), professes to be one of the largest. A short walk from Tsukiji Market and its wonderful surrounds, this market is worth a visit for its lovely selection of foodly and crafty items that rivals the goodies found at the UNU Market.
10am to 4pm
Step out of Kachidoke Station at Exits A4a or A4b and look for the tents.

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Osonbashi Marche
*This appears to be on hold for the moment. I'll update as I find out when it will happen again.
This new market in Yokohama is one I have only seen a poster and website for, but not been to yet. The venue should be beautiful, and I have no doubt the offerings will be good. Keep in mind that it is relatively new, so it might be small. However, markets don't get bigger and better if you don't go to them and support the people there. I can't go this month, but I'd love to hear from anyone who does!
10:30am to 3:30pm
Nihon-Oodoori Station
Look for the exit for the International Ferry Passenger Terminal and follow the signs.

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Monday, May 7, 2018

May Kanagawa Garden Update

Garden at twilight.

Let's just say the first week of May was madness. We moved house, which meant a great deal of excitement, fun, stress, and trying to remember where things might be located. Life has settled down for the most part, and we are very happy in our new home. The only downside is that our new place is further from my garden. Even more than usual, resiliency is going to be the name of the game for my little patch.

The red onions in their wara mulch are doing well, and I inter-planted them with arugula, kale, swiss chard, and violas. While it may appear to be madness to many, I abhor bare soil in my garden. Hence, plants like vetch, dokudame, clover, fleabane daisy, poppy, and dandelion are more than welcome. It creates a pleasant sort of chaos, but these plants also serve other purposes. They attract pollinators, predator insects, and offer shelter to the frogs, salamanders, spiders and praying mantises that live in my garden.

They also play other roles. In the case of dandelion, the plant's deep taproot draws nutrients up from deep underground that go right back into the soil when I pull them and lay them on top of the soil again to protect it from erosion. (Hat tip to Michael Phillips for that piece of advice.) In the case of vetch, it is far preferred by aphids than anything else the little vampires devour. Vetch, also known in Japanese as kurasunoendou, is also a member of the bean family. As such, it is a natural gatherer and depositor of nitrogen. The tiny flowers, too, are a favorite of bees of all sizes, shapes, and types.

The bees are also enjoying the flowers on the kale and norabo plants. About a quarter of my garden space is dedicated to those plants, and others pop up here and there among the potatoes, strawberries, and along the sides where seeds landed last year and decided to sprout. I don't fight any of it as we get plenty to eat and share. The fragrance of those blossoms, too, is heavenly. I can see why they are drawn to them like moths to a flame.

Moths, too, do arrive, but I also don't fight them much. They also help pollinate while they snack and use my plants as a nursery. If I see their fat green caterpillars, I remove them from the leaf and place them in the path. I don't have too many so far, as I'm assuming the birds and various arthropods living in my garden give them a reasonable run for their money. Plus, any that do come home with me get washed off and placed in the compost.

The potatoes are going great guns as are the strawberries. (I've always thought it odd that strawberries are a fruit associated with Christmas and the New Year here, but that just shows the power of marketing. In order to make that happen, they must be grown in hot houses or shipped long distances from warmer climes. I can never eat them at that time of year without feeling uneasy.) The latter will finish soon, but the former are still a few weeks from being ready for harvest. Both plants are beautiful, and their flowers stunning additions to the menagerie of colors and shapes filling my beds.

The popcorn is planted, three rows of it, and I'm eagerly awaiting the first sprouts. There is something particularly satisfying for me about growing this crop. Maybe it is the memory of shelling the cobs with my mother in the kitchen and then watching the kernels burst in the popper. Maybe it is the joy of this particular variety, Smoke Signals, which I could gaze at all day for the myriad colors laid out in rows along each cob. Maybe it is the nutty taste of the popcorn that is so much more satisfying than standard popcorn that is more reminiscent of Styrofoam in terms of taste and texture. Maybe it is the novelty of growing something that most people don't know much about beyond movie theaters and microwaves.

The tomato seedlings are in and doing their best to settle into their new surroundings. I may have started them a bit too early, but I am hopeful that their legginess will not prove to be too much of a detriment. My concern for their well-being is one drawback of being so far away now. I'd like to be able to go daily and fuss over them, but maybe it is best that I don't. I do have a bundle of basil seedlings to plant near them, so we shall see how it goes in a couple days when the rain stops. I'll have more photos to post then, too.

Friday, May 4, 2018

May Farmers Markets in Tokyo and Yokohama

Eiji Nagashima of Mamettai Farm in Shimoda at the UNU Market.

May is when the seasons begin to hint at summer while still speaking strongly of spring. Temperatures are on the rise and just about everything in sight is blooming. Farmers and gardeners are setting seeds and seedlings in the soil at a record pace, and tables at markets and chokubaijo shelves are starting to fill. Rice fields, too, are being planted this month! The season's best offerings may be lettuce, peas, and the last of the winter veg, but don't fret. Locally grown strawberries should be appearing everywhere shortly, and early onions should be snapped up, too. See you at the market!

Greenmarket Sumida
Saturday, May 3 and Sunday, May 4
Just over the bridge from Senso-ji is the newest market in the heart of the city. A collaborative effort between the local government and the same folks who manage Market of the Sun and Yokohama's Kitanaka Marche, Greenmarket Sumida aims to fill the supermarket gap in this old neighborhood. An excellent selection of food trucks nourish weary shoppers while the Beer Truck is often on hand to slake their thirst.
10am to 4pm
Asakusa Station
Exit the station and cross the river towards the Asahi Building. Turn left and follow the path to the pocket park on the right.

Market of the Sun
Saturday, May 12 and Sunday, May 13
One of Tokyo's newer markets, Market of the Sun (a.k.a. Taiyo Marche), professes to be one of the largest. A short walk from Tsukiji Market and its wonderful surrounds, this market is worth a visit for its lovely selection of foodly and crafty items that rivals the goodies found at the UNU Market.
10am to 4pm
Step out of Kachidoke Station at Exits A4a or A4b and look for the tents.

Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho Asaichi
Sunday, May 20
Early birds on Tokyo's west side should count themselves lucky to find this little market in the warren of shops just north of the station. While fruits and veg are a bit lacking, the market is big on craftsmen and women doing interesting work, excellent baked goods, miso, rice, and other tasty treats. It's worth noting that a number of places offer breakfast deals in the market!
Look for my review in Outdoor Japan's Spring Traveler!
7am - 10am

Koenji Farmers Market
Saturday, May 19*
Spotted a handful of years ago while riding the Chuo Line, this little market is still going strong. A circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre marks the spot where friendly folks with good food and interesting stories await.
*A wee bit of a best guess here as they haven't updated their blog yet. Do check before making the trip over there.
11am - 6pm
Map

Nippori Farmers Market
Saturday, May 19 and Sunday, May 20
This charming market in the heart of old Tokyo abounds with a sense of community and friendliness as well as good food. Small but lively, particularly on Saturday, it features a monthly geographical theme although regular vendors include Tohoku growers and some of the best steamed manju in the world.
No map, but just head out the East Exit and look for the green awnings
10am to 5pm

Yokohama Kitanaka Marche
Saturday, May 19 and Sunday, May 20
One of the best markets going in the Yokohama area, and it's perhaps no coincidence that they are only moments away from Baird Beer's Bashamichi Taproom. Started by the same folks who created the Market of the Sun, the Kitanaka Marche to be growing steadily with tasty offerings of fresh seasonal veg, fruit, baked goods and preserves. Read my other review over at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine for the full scoop.
10am to 4pm
Bashamichi Station, Exit 2*
Note that the market has moved, so come out of the station, turn right, and take the next right turn. Keep walking past the construction site and keep an eye out for the white tents running along next to the river.

Earth Day Market
Sunday, May 20
I could wax on forever about how great this market is and how important it is for the future of Japanese farming and global food security. However, I'll just insist that folks go and see for themselves what great things the market and these innovative growers are doing. Come find some good food and fun!
10am to 4pm, Rain or shine
Map

Oiso Farmers Market
Sunday, May 20
This little gem of a community shindig is one of the best things going outside of the Earth Day Market. Started a handful of years ago, it blossomed into a full-on monthly festival that just happens to feature Shonan area produce in its fresh, seasonal form as well as pickled, dried, and prepared-hot-in-a-bowl varieties. In summer, it transforms into a night market, while year-round a much smaller version takes place every Saturday. Lee's Bread alone is worth the journey. Read my full review at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine.
10am to 2pm
Oiso Port Building

Kamome Marche
Saturday, May 27
Set on the upper level of the Yokohama Bay Quarter, this little market offers nice variety given its size. Vendors from Yamanashi, Yokohama, and other parts of Kanagawa brave the steady ocean breeze and offer everything up from fruit to wine to fresh vegetables.
11am - 5pm
Map

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Osonbashi Marche
*This appears to be on hold for the moment. I'll update as I find out when it will happen again.
This new market in Yokohama is one I have only seen a poster and website for, but not been to yet. The venue should be beautiful, and I have no doubt the offerings will be good. Keep in mind that it is relatively new, so it might be small. However, markets don't get bigger and better if you don't go to them and support the people there. I can't go this month, but I'd love to hear from anyone who does!
10:30am to 3:30pm
Nihon-Oodoori Station
Look for the exit for the International Ferry Passenger Terminal and follow the signs.

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!