Monday, March 18, 2019

Experience Farms and Community Gardens in Japan: How to Start Growing Your Own Food

My shimin nouen spot!

This post first appeared on March 5, 2018. The links have been updated and checked; however, if you happen to know of other options, please do let me know in the comments below. I'd be very happy to add them to the list! -JB

I'm often asked if I know how people can find a little spot of their own to grow something in Japan. This post offers a variety of links to help people get started on their hunt.

Shimin Nouen (Community Gardens)
Shimin nouen (community gardens) and taiken nouen (experience farms) are a great way to get a little garden, get involved with the community here, and have some tasty fun, too. Shimin nouen tend to be run by local governments - cities, prefectures, or towns - and are scattered about the area. There will be rules about managing the plot, possibly about what materials (organic or not) can be used, pets, children, and possibly even times of access. Terms of use may be limited to two or three years in popular locations, while in others the spot is yours for the growing as long as you like. My shimin nouen is actually a local club activity with some rules but no term limits. More of this kind do exist, but they usually don't have websites. Word of mouth is how most folks learn about them, so be friendly!

A weekend session explaining the project for the day at a taiken nouen.

Taiken Nouen (Experience Farms)

Taiken nouen are often run by NPPO's or private farmers who want to keep their land in production but don't necessarily want to farm on a large scale. Taiken nouen offer these farmers, particularly in urban and suburban areas, the chance to do just that. It also caters to member of the local community hankering to get their hands in the dirt but not sure where or how to start. Twice a month on weekends classes are offered in everything from planting seeds to pests to techniques for weeding and harvest times. It can be a pretty highly managed affair, but for newbies it is just the kind of hand-holding that is needed and wanted. The farmers I helped out in Tokyo for five years made the transition to this a few years ago and have no regrets, especially now that their two adorable grandchildren are on the scene. The people participating seem very happy, too, as more than half of the members renewed again for this year! (They still have openings, I believe, so check out their web page.)

Work underway at a taiken nouen.

Renting a Field
It is also possible to rent a farmers field, but I'd only advise that if your language and culture skills were reasonably strong and if you live in a semi-rural area. Being known and connected is very important here, and even eager Japanese growers can find this a challenge, so don't feel that you are being singled out if you are a foreigner. Pleasant persistence is sometimes the most effective tool in this situation along with patience.

Useful Websites for Finding a Place to Grow
Following is a list of websites to get you started on your hunt. Prices vary by location and program, but all should be satisfying. Much of this information does not exist in English at all, so make good use of Google translate and then be brave and head out to see how you can get involved. To be honest, if you are a foreigner, you may be greeted with friendly hesitation at first. However, pleasant persistence, lots of smiling and a general easy-goingness will take you far.

FarmNavi - This website lists both community gardens and experience farms all over Japan. It is not totally comprehensive, but it is a good resource to get the ball rolling.

Sharebatake - Another great website for finding taiken nouen operations all over Japan. The name combines the word 'share' with 'hatake (farm)'. (The h goes to b for pronunciation purposes.) Clever, eh?

Nyouen Kyoukai - This nationwide taiken nouen NPO offers information on experience farms all over the country. This happens to be the organization that my Tokyo farmers work with, too.

As I mentioned above, each prefecture and city provides a list of community gardens like this page from Kanagawa Prefecture.

This page for Oiso, a coastal town in Kanagawa, offers a list of the community gardens, the number of spots available, and lays out fees and terms. Some do have a limited time usage (up to three years, for example), so be sure to ask.

Local Japan Agriculture (JA) offices will also sometimes list farms or places open to community agriculture that might be anything from straight-up gardening to citrus farming or a kind of taiken nouen. This one for Hadano City in Kanagawa is a good example.

Then there are organizations like Oiso Farm, which is a kind of hybrid of all of these yet again, that combine some form of hands-on farming experience with potlucks, work parties, regular parties, and general fun. (This group is definitely foreigner friendly and also happens to be the force behind the lovely Oiso Market, by the way. )

Friday, March 15, 2019

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, March 16 and Sunday, March 17

Smoked umeboshi from Nara at the Ebisu Marche!

Welcome to the most farmers-markety weekend of the month! There is really no shortage of awesome markets to visit this weekend, so perhaps take an extra bag with you. Better yet, head out both days to one of these lovely spots and see what seasonal delights you might find!

Koenji Farmers Market

Saturday, March 16*
Spotted a handful of years ago while riding the Chuo Line, this little market is still going strong. A circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre marks the spot where friendly folks with good food and interesting stories await.
*A wee bit of a best guess here as they haven't updated their blog yet. Do check before making the trip over there. I haven't been wrong yet about the date, but there is always a first time for everything.
11am - 6pm
Map

Oiso Farmers Market
Sunday, March 17
This little gem of a community shindig is one of the best things going outside of the Earth Day Market. Started a handful of years ago, it blossomed into a full-on monthly festival that just happens to feature Shonan area produce in its fresh, seasonal form as well as pickled, dried, and prepared-hot-in-a-bowl varieties. In summer, it transforms into a night market, while year-round a much smaller version takes place every Saturday. Lee's Bread alone is worth the journey. Read my full review at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine.
9am - 2pm
Oiso Port Building

Nippori Farmers Market
Saturday, March 16 and Sunday, March 17
This charming market in the heart of old Tokyo abounds with a sense of community and friendliness as well as good food. Small but lively, particularly on Saturday, it features a monthly geographical theme although regular vendors include Tohoku growers and some of the best steamed manju in the world.
No map, but just head out the East Exit and look for the green awnings
10am to 5pm

Yokohama Kitanaka Marche

Saturday, March 16 and Sunday, March 17
One of the best markets going in the Yokohama area, and it's perhaps no coincidence that they are only moments away from Baird Beer's Bashamichi Taproom. Started by the same folks who created the Market of the Sun, the Kitanaka Marche to be growing steadily with tasty offerings of fresh seasonal veg, fruit, baked goods and preserves. Read my other review over at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine for the full scoop.
10am to 4pm
Bashamichi Station, Exit 2*
Note that the market has moved, so come out of the station, turn right, and take the next right turn. Keep walking past the construction site and keep an eye out for the white tents running along next to the river.

Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho Asaichi
Sunday, March 17
Early birds on Tokyo's west side should count themselves lucky to find this little market in the warren of shops just north of the station. While fruits and veg are a bit lacking, the market is big on craftsmen and women doing interesting work, excellent baked goods, miso, rice, and other tasty treats. It's worth noting that a number of places offer breakfast deals in the market!
Look for my review in Outdoor Japan's Spring Traveler!
7am - 10am

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, March 8, 2019

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, March 9 and Sunday, March 10

Wending my way through Kichijoji's delightful Harmonica Yokocho Market.

A charming set of markets on this weekend for your shopping and dining pleasure. Peruse the tables at the ever wonderful Market of the Sun to see what delights this early spring day might bring or head on over to Hills Marche to see what goodies are in store. There is no shortage of fun to be had and treats to be found.

Market of the Sun
Saturday, March 9 and Sunday, March 10
It's hard to believe this 'new' market is already five years old! Market of the Sun (a.k.a. Taiyo Marche) professes to be one of the largest, and it is certainly a good one. A short walk from Tsukiji Market and its wonderful surrounds, this market is worth a visit for its lovely selection of foodly and crafty items that rivals the goodies found at the UNU Market.
10am to 4pm
Step out of Kachidoke Station at Exits A4a or A4b and look for the tents.

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, March 1, 2019

March Farmers Markets in Tokyo and Yokohama Regions

Iyoshi Cola at the UNU Market.

March is already rip-roaring along and the markets are hopping! It's hard to believe that ume blossoms are here and nearly done, and the sakura buds are looking pretty fat and sassy even in these chill winds. Potatoes are in and pea vines reaching for the sky. Farmers and gardeners are eyeballing their space and debating the merits of this or that variety, this or that new technique. Don't miss the chance to venture out to one of these great markets and see what wonders of the season you can find!

Market of the Sun
Saturday, March 9 and Sunday, March 10
It's hard to believe this 'new' market is already five years old! Market of the Sun (a.k.a. Taiyo Marche) professes to be one of the largest, and it is certainly a good one. A short walk from Tsukiji Market and its wonderful surrounds, this market is worth a visit for its lovely selection of foodly and crafty items that rivals the goodies found at the UNU Market.
10am to 4pm
Step out of Kachidoke Station at Exits A4a or A4b and look for the tents.

Koenji Farmers Market
Saturday, March 16*
Spotted a handful of years ago while riding the Chuo Line, this little market is still going strong. A circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre marks the spot where friendly folks with good food and interesting stories await.
*A wee bit of a best guess here as they haven't updated their blog yet. Do check before making the trip over there. I haven't been wrong yet about the date, but there is always a first time for everything.
11am - 6pm
Map

Oiso Farmers Market
Sunday, March 17
This little gem of a community shindig is one of the best things going outside of the Earth Day Market. Started a handful of years ago, it blossomed into a full-on monthly festival that just happens to feature Shonan area produce in its fresh, seasonal form as well as pickled, dried, and prepared-hot-in-a-bowl varieties. In summer, it transforms into a night market, while year-round a much smaller version takes place every Saturday. Lee's Bread alone is worth the journey. Read my full review at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine.
9am - 2pm
Oiso Port Building

Nippori Farmers Market
Saturday, March 16 and Sunday, March 17
This charming market in the heart of old Tokyo abounds with a sense of community and friendliness as well as good food. Small but lively, particularly on Saturday, it features a monthly geographical theme although regular vendors include Tohoku growers and some of the best steamed manju in the world.
No map, but just head out the East Exit and look for the green awnings
10am to 5pm

Yokohama Kitanaka Marche

Saturday, March 16 and Sunday, March 17
One of the best markets going in the Yokohama area, and it's perhaps no coincidence that they are only moments away from Baird Beer's Bashamichi Taproom. Started by the same folks who created the Market of the Sun, the Kitanaka Marche to be growing steadily with tasty offerings of fresh seasonal veg, fruit, baked goods and preserves. Read my other review over at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine for the full scoop.
10am to 4pm
Bashamichi Station, Exit 2*
Note that the market has moved, so come out of the station, turn right, and take the next right turn. Keep walking past the construction site and keep an eye out for the white tents running along next to the river.

Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho Asaichi
Sunday, March 17
Early birds on Tokyo's west side should count themselves lucky to find this little market in the warren of shops just north of the station. While fruits and veg are a bit lacking, the market is big on craftsmen and women doing interesting work, excellent baked goods, miso, rice, and other tasty treats. It's worth noting that a number of places offer breakfast deals in the market!
Look for my review in Outdoor Japan's Spring Traveler!
7am - 10am

Kamome Marche
Saturday, March 23
Set on the upper level of the Yokohama Bay Quarter, this little market offers nice variety given its size. Vendors from Yamanashi, Yokohama, and other parts of Kanagawa brave the steady ocean breeze and offer everything up from fruit to wine to fresh vegetables.
11am - 5pm
Map

Osonbashi Marche
**No new dates scheduled yet**
This new market in Yokohama is one I have only seen a poster and website for, but not been to yet. The venue should be beautiful, and I have no doubt the offerings will be good. Keep in mind that it is relatively new, so it might be small. However, markets don't get bigger and better if you don't go to them and support the people there. I can't go this month, but I'd love to hear from anyone who does!
10:30am to 3:30pm
Nihon-Oodoori Station
Look for the exit for the International Ferry Passenger Terminal and follow the signs.

Greenmarket Sumida
Saturday, March 2 and Sunday, March 3
Just over the bridge from Senso-ji is the newest market in the heart of the city. A collaborative effort between the local government and the same folks who manage Market of the Sun and Yokohama's Kitanaka Marche, Greenmarket Sumida aims to fill the supermarket gap in this old neighborhood. An excellent selection of food trucks nourish weary shoppers while the Beer Truck is often on hand to slake their thirst.
10am to 4pm
Asakusa Station
Exit the station and cross the river towards the Asahi Building. Turn left and follow the path to the pocket park on the right.

Earth Day Market
**No New Dates Scheduled**
I could wax on forever about how great this market is and how important it is for the future of Japanese farming and global food security. However, I'll just insist that folks go and see for themselves what great things the market and these innovative growers are doing. Come find some good food and fun!
10am to 4pm, Rain or shine
Map

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, February 22, 2019

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, February 23 and Sunday, February 24

Ebisu Marche awesome every weekend!

As the month winds down, the markets become a little scarce but not impossible to find. Head on out to one of these lovely spots and see what you might find! The farmers will be there, bundled up, and ready to answer any questions you might have. Enjoy!

Kamome Marche
Saturday, February 23
Set on the upper level of the Yokohama Bay Quarter, this little market offers nice variety given its size. Vendors from Yamanashi, Yokohama, and other parts of Kanagawa brave the steady ocean breeze and offer everything up from fruit to wine to fresh vegetables.
11am - 5pm
Map

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, February 15, 2019

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, February 16 and Sunday, February 17

Happy Valentine's Day!
Salty sweet snack from Kichijoji Marche.

Welcome to the most farmers-markety weekend of the month! There are no shortages of great markets to visit, awesome growers and producers to meet, and, of course, heaps of good food to be had, too. Peruse the list, take your pick, and head out the door!

Koenji Farmers Market

Saturday, February 16*
Spotted a handful of years ago while riding the Chuo Line, this little market is still going strong. A circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre marks the spot where friendly folks with good food and interesting stories await.
*A wee bit of a best guess here as they haven't updated their blog yet. Do check before making the trip over there. I haven't been wrong yet about the date, but there is always a first time for everything.
11am - 6pm
Map

Oiso Farmers Market
Sunday, February 17
This little gem of a community shindig is one of the best things going outside of the Earth Day Market. Started a handful of years ago, it blossomed into a full-on monthly festival that just happens to feature Shonan area produce in its fresh, seasonal form as well as pickled, dried, and prepared-hot-in-a-bowl varieties. In summer, it transforms into a night market, while year-round a much smaller version takes place every Saturday. Lee's Bread alone is worth the journey. Read my full review at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine.
9am - 2pm
Oiso Port Building

Nippori Farmers Market
Saturday, February 16 and Sunday, February 17
This charming market in the heart of old Tokyo abounds with a sense of community and friendliness as well as good food. Small but lively, particularly on Saturday, it features a monthly geographical theme although regular vendors include Tohoku growers and some of the best steamed manju in the world.
No map, but just head out the East Exit and look for the green awnings
10am to 5pm

Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho Asaichi
Sunday, February 17
Early birds on Tokyo's west side should count themselves lucky to find this little market in the warren of shops just north of the station. While fruits and veg are a bit lacking, the market is big on craftsmen and women doing interesting work, excellent baked goods, miso, rice, and other tasty treats. It's worth noting that a number of places offer breakfast deals in the market!
Look for my review in Outdoor Japan's Spring Traveler!
7am - 10am

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, February 8, 2019

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, February 9 and Sunday, February 10

Snacks and cool soap at Kichijoji's Asaichi! Get up and get down there!

A tidy little handful of markets this weekend. Snow is forecast for Saturday, so be aware that things may get slowed down some. Be patient with yourself and others as you hunt for veg for whatever tasty dish you've got in mind. Be careful, too, as Tokyo and environs are populated with people who don't always know exactly what to do when it snows. Check market websites before heading out to make sure they are still going or going the full amount of time.

Market of the Sun
Saturday, February 9 and Sunday, February 10
It's hard to believe this 'new' market is already five years old! Market of the Sun (a.k.a. Taiyo Marche) professes to be one of the largest, and it is certainly a good one. A short walk from Tsukiji Market and its wonderful surrounds, this market is worth a visit for its lovely selection of foodly and crafty items that rivals the goodies found at the UNU Market.
10am to 4pm
Step out of Kachidoke Station at Exits A4a or A4b and look for the tents.

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Monday, February 4, 2019

Winter Recipes: Greens

The riot of greens going on in my garden right now.

You might be surprised that I still visit farmers markets in winter, or that winter is my favorite season for vegetables in Japan.

"What is growing now?  It's too cold, isn't it?" you ask with eyebrows raised and often leaning back a bit as though afraid of what I might say next. When I talk about winter vegetables, you may lean even further back, and I'll worry that you might fall off your chair.

It is then my pleasure to tell you (or anyone else within earshot, frankly) of foods you already know: daikon and kabu, komatsuna and hourensou (spinach) as well as some you may not - norabo and kale (including the ornamental variety in pots just now), shungiku (edible chrysanthemum greens) and karashina. Mizuna, too, is on the list as are negi (long onions) and hakusai (Chinese cabbage) plus those old friends, kabbetsu (cabbage) and broccoli. Many of these are available real round in grocery stores, but winter is the season when they really shine.

Each of these vegetables can grow at warmer times of the year, but many actually taste better during the winter. Kale, broccoli, cabbage, and norabo, for example, become a bit sweeter with a good frost. Their natural reaction to the cold is to pump sugar into their leaves and stems to keep them from freezing. So, even though those leaves may be tinged a bit red or purple, they are delicious.

If these plants grow at a warmer time of the year, they may rush through their growing cycle, flower, and go to seed. Again, the doesn't mean they aren't edible. They are still delicious but in a slightly different form. Think of it as steak versus hamburger. Both are beef, but delicious in either form.

By this time, you're wide-eyed and nodding your head as this new world opens up before you. Later, you might even tell me that you shared this information with friends, who were just as pleasantly surprised. That's my hope, at least, which probably means I am evangelizing for vegetables. I'm glad to do it. If you understand what is available at this time of year and why it looks the way it does, then chances are good you'll buy it and eat it. That, in turn, is good for the growers and good for the plants. If we eat those things, then farmers will keep planting them.

However, I digress.

The next question is how to cook these vegetables. Most Japanese people know, but they are often curious what I, a foreigner, do with these items, and other foreigners are often wishing they had some idea of what to do. They would like to eat them, of course, but they hold back because they don't want to invest in something they don't know the first thing about. Here are my suggestions, ranging from full-on recipes to simple tricks.

Goma Ai Shungiku
This is a very simple traditional recipe for making shungiku, but with a minor adjustment of the boiling time you can substitute any of the greens found at farmers markets or chokubaijo (direct sale stands). Shungiku spends less than a minute in the boiling water, but other, more tender greens, like komatsuna and spinach, should only be in about ten seconds of so. Sturdier greens like norabo, kale, and broccoli leaves should be about the same as shungiku.

Mottainai Tip: Save that vegetable water for a broth or cooking rice. You can keep it in the fridge for a few days or freeze it for later.

Kimchi
Don't turn up your nose or shy away from a dish that might feel intimidating. Making it is not difficult, and unlike my recipe for it, you don't have to keep it in the bathtub. There is also a Bulgarian version I learned last year, but I don't know the recipe off-hand. I'm on the hunt and will add it here when I've got it and tried it for myself.

Nanohana no Kurashi
This is truly a classic spring dish, but folks can cheat a little bit and serve it up early with komatsuna, spinach, or norabo.

Salad
Well, there is no recipe here, actually, but this is easily my favorite way to eat winter vegetables. I simply gather stems from whatever greens I have, whack up the leafy parts, and toss it together with vinegar, olive oil, and shouyu (soy sauce). Throw in carrot, daikon and kabu, if you like. If you have edible flowers like violas and pansies, both winter hardy bloomers, add those for visual delight. Sprigs of habotan (ornamental kale) can get snipped and tossed in, too.  (It's edible and decorative, bless its' leafy little heart.)

Blanching Greens
If you have a garden of greens and a limited capacity for eating them in a timely manner, you can blanche and freeze them. I don't have a pressure canner or a dehydrator, so this is the best method I've found for preserving. I should mention that I get a little lazy and don't cut them up perhaps as much as I should. I then end up with long stemmy bits in my soup. They are quite edible but not attractive.

Soup
OK, so there is no recipe here, either, but just some advice. I often cut up our fresh greens and place them in the bottom of our soup bowls. When the soup is ready, I just ladle it over the top and serve. The greens become the most beautiful shade of green and are softened just the right amount.

Have other ideas or suggestions? Please share!

Friday, February 1, 2019

February Farmers Markets in Tokyo and Yokohama Regions

Tasty chai mix at Kichijoji Asaichi!

This short month is off to a tumultuous start. Warm, then cold, then warm, then snow. Who knows what each day will hold?  Luckily, each one can hold some tasty food! Head on out to one of these lovely markets and see what wonders you can find.

Market of the Sun
Saturday, February 9 and Sunday, February 10
It's hard to believe this 'new' market is already five years old! Market of the Sun (a.k.a. Taiyo Marche) professes to be one of the largest, and it is certainly a good one. A short walk from Tsukiji Market and its wonderful surrounds, this market is worth a visit for its lovely selection of foodly and crafty items that rivals the goodies found at the UNU Market.
10am to 4pm
Step out of Kachidoke Station at Exits A4a or A4b and look for the tents.

Koenji Farmers Market
Saturday, February 16*
Spotted a handful of years ago while riding the Chuo Line, this little market is still going strong. A circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre marks the spot where friendly folks with good food and interesting stories await.
*A wee bit of a best guess here as they haven't updated their blog yet. Do check before making the trip over there. I haven't been wrong yet about the date, but there is always a first time for everything.
11am - 6pm
Map

Oiso Farmers Market
Sunday, February 17
This little gem of a community shindig is one of the best things going outside of the Earth Day Market. Started a handful of years ago, it blossomed into a full-on monthly festival that just happens to feature Shonan area produce in its fresh, seasonal form as well as pickled, dried, and prepared-hot-in-a-bowl varieties. In summer, it transforms into a night market, while year-round a much smaller version takes place every Saturday. Lee's Bread alone is worth the journey. Read my full review at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine.
9am - 2pm
Oiso Port Building

Nippori Farmers Market
Saturday, February 16 and Sunday, February 17
This charming market in the heart of old Tokyo abounds with a sense of community and friendliness as well as good food. Small but lively, particularly on Saturday, it features a monthly geographical theme although regular vendors include Tohoku growers and some of the best steamed manju in the world.
No map, but just head out the East Exit and look for the green awnings
10am to 5pm

Yokohama Kitanaka Marche

*No market until March!)
One of the best markets going in the Yokohama area, and it's perhaps no coincidence that they are only moments away from Baird Beer's Bashamichi Taproom. Started by the same folks who created the Market of the Sun, the Kitanaka Marche to be growing steadily with tasty offerings of fresh seasonal veg, fruit, baked goods and preserves. Read my other review over at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine for the full scoop.
10am to 4pm
Bashamichi Station, Exit 2*
Note that the market has moved, so come out of the station, turn right, and take the next right turn. Keep walking past the construction site and keep an eye out for the white tents running along next to the river.

Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho Asaichi
Sunday, February 17
Early birds on Tokyo's west side should count themselves lucky to find this little market in the warren of shops just north of the station. While fruits and veg are a bit lacking, the market is big on craftsmen and women doing interesting work, excellent baked goods, miso, rice, and other tasty treats. It's worth noting that a number of places offer breakfast deals in the market!
Look for my review in Outdoor Japan's Spring Traveler!
7am - 10am

Kamome Marche
Saturday, February 23
Set on the upper level of the Yokohama Bay Quarter, this little market offers nice variety given its size. Vendors from Yamanashi, Yokohama, and other parts of Kanagawa brave the steady ocean breeze and offer everything up from fruit to wine to fresh vegetables.
11am - 5pm
Map

Osonbashi Marche
**No new dates scheduled yet**
This new market in Yokohama is one I have only seen a poster and website for, but not been to yet. The venue should be beautiful, and I have no doubt the offerings will be good. Keep in mind that it is relatively new, so it might be small. However, markets don't get bigger and better if you don't go to them and support the people there. I can't go this month, but I'd love to hear from anyone who does!
10:30am to 3:30pm
Nihon-Oodoori Station
Look for the exit for the International Ferry Passenger Terminal and follow the signs.

Greenmarket Sumida
**No market until March 2**
How will we manage?!?
Just over the bridge from Senso-ji is the newest market in the heart of the city. A collaborative effort between the local government and the same folks who manage Market of the Sun and Yokohama's Kitanaka Marche, Greenmarket Sumida aims to fill the supermarket gap in this old neighborhood. An excellent selection of food trucks nourish weary shoppers while the Beer Truck is often on hand to slake their thirst.
10am to 4pm
Asakusa Station
Exit the station and cross the river towards the Asahi Building. Turn left and follow the path to the pocket park on the right.

Earth Day Market
**No New Dates Scheduled**
I could wax on forever about how great this market is and how important it is for the future of Japanese farming and global food security. However, I'll just insist that folks go and see for themselves what great things the market and these innovative growers are doing. Come find some good food and fun!
10am to 4pm, Rain or shine
Map

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, January 25, 2019

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, January 26 and Sunday, January 27

Maria Grazia Santovito and her hand-painted bottles at the UNU Marche!

Snow is again in the forecast for this weekend, but let that be a motivator to get you out the door and to one of these lovely markets. Ask a vendor for their favorite recipe and sip a bit of hot something or other as you listen. You won't be disappointed by the result. From yuzu to a fun assortment of winter vegetables, great food awaits!

Kamome Marche
Saturday, January 26
Set on the upper level of the Yokohama Bay Quarter, this little market offers nice variety given its size. Vendors from Yamanashi, Yokohama, and other parts of Kanagawa brave the steady ocean breeze and offer everything up from fruit to wine to fresh vegetables.
11am - 5pm
Map

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Friday, January 18, 2019

Tokyo and Yokohama Regional Farmers Markets: Saturday, January 19 and Sunday, January 20

Majimena Honey at the UNU Market!

Another brilliant winter weekend for visiting regional farmers markets is in store, so don't miss the opportunity. It is worth reminding folks, too, that this is the boomingest weekend of the month for markets. so if there is a New Year's resolution out there to eat better, buy local, or even practice Japanese, this is a great time and way to put it in action. Best things to look for are citrus, winter vegetables, and satoimo along with the usual items such as rice, tea, honey, pickles, nifty bakery items, and jam.

Koenji Farmers Market

Saturday, January 19*
Spotted a handful of years ago while riding the Chuo Line, this little market is still going strong. A circle of red awnings in front of the Za-Koenji Public Theatre marks the spot where friendly folks with good food and interesting stories await.
*A wee bit of a best guess here as they haven't updated their blog yet. Do check before making the trip over there. I haven't been wrong yet about the date, but there is always a first time for everything.
11am - 6pm
Map

Oiso Farmers Market
Sunday, January 20
This little gem of a community shindig is one of the best things going outside of the Earth Day Market. Started a handful of years ago, it blossomed into a full-on monthly festival that just happens to feature Shonan area produce in its fresh, seasonal form as well as pickled, dried, and prepared-hot-in-a-bowl varieties. In summer, it transforms into a night market, while year-round a much smaller version takes place every Saturday. Lee's Bread alone is worth the journey. Read my full review at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine.
9am - 2pm
Oiso Port Building

Nippori Farmers Market
Saturday, January 19 and Sunday, January 20
This charming market in the heart of old Tokyo abounds with a sense of community and friendliness as well as good food. Small but lively, particularly on Saturday, it features a monthly geographical theme although regular vendors include Tohoku growers and some of the best steamed manju in the world.
No map, but just head out the East Exit and look for the green awnings
10am to 5pm

Yokohama Kitanaka Marche

Saturday, January 19 and Sunday, January 20
One of the best markets going in the Yokohama area, and it's perhaps no coincidence that they are only moments away from Baird Beer's Bashamichi Taproom. Started by the same folks who created the Market of the Sun, the Kitanaka Marche to be growing steadily with tasty offerings of fresh seasonal veg, fruit, baked goods and preserves. Read my other review over at Outdoor Japan's Traveler Magazine for the full scoop.
10am to 4pm
Bashamichi Station, Exit 2*
Note that the market has moved, so come out of the station, turn right, and take the next right turn. Keep walking past the construction site and keep an eye out for the white tents running along next to the river.

Kichijoji Harmonica Yokocho Asaichi
Sunday, January 20
Early birds on Tokyo's west side should count themselves lucky to find this little market in the warren of shops just north of the station. While fruits and veg are a bit lacking, the market is big on craftsmen and women doing interesting work, excellent baked goods, miso, rice, and other tasty treats. It's worth noting that a number of places offer breakfast deals in the market!
Look for my review in Outdoor Japan's Spring Traveler!
7am - 10am

Kamakura Farmers Market
Every day
This market is an absolute treasure of a small local affair featuring Kamakura heirloom fruits and vegetables raised in or nearby another one of Japan's former capitals. Head in early to get the best selection and pick up a loaf of Paradise Alley's charcoal-infused bread while you're there. They also make an excellent cup of coffee.
7am until sold out
Map

Ebisu Market
Every Sunday
A small handful of years ago, the Ebisu Market became a weekly Sunday event. Part of the original Marche Japon movement, this market carries on with a nice selection of regional farmers, seasonal veg, baked goods, and the addition of arts and crafts. It does bill itself as all organic, and there are some; however, I recommend asking vendors to be sure. I also recommend a trip to Afuri Ramen to fortify yourself with some of the best yuzu tsukemen in town.
11am to 5pm
Map

UN University Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
A massive weekend affair that started out as the flagship market for Marche Japon busted out on its own a few years back. Now one of the most happening places on the weekend, the market features a variety of fruits and vegetables and prepared products from all over Japan. Winter vegetables can be found here, but produce offerings do vary in amount by season. There is a most excellent selection of food trucks whipping up everything from salad to zingy curry to roast chicken and falafel! Oh, and don't forget the craft beer truck, too!
10am to 4pm
Map

Hills Marche Farmers Market
Every Tuesday and Saturday
The Ark Hills Marche in Roppongi is perhaps one of the best things going in this part of Tokyo. Originally created to serve residents of the nearby high-rise, it is a bountiful and booming event. Don't miss the chance to meet a grower from Tokyo's very own Kokobunji, take in a little music, and sample a variety of other seasonal delights.
Saturday, 10am to 4pm
Tuesday, 11am to 7pm**
Map

Yurakucho Farmers Market
Every Saturday and Sunday
Smaller than the UNU Market, the Yurakucho Market takes its cue from the antenna shops located nearby and features a particular region of Japan each week along with an excellent selection of seasonal fruit and vegetables. Growers from nearby Chiba, Kamakura, and Saitama do come weekly, though, with some excellent treats.
11am to 5pm
Directions: Turn left out of Yurakucho Station and cross the courtyard toward Tokyo Kouku Keitan. Look for the fun under the overhang!

Know of a market? Give me a shout, and I'll add it to the list!

Monday, January 14, 2019

Winter Recipes: Yuzu

Yuzu ready to be harvested!

One of the things that often comes up for people whether they are new to Japan or have lived here a long time is what to do with the various items they find at farmers markets. People are often surprised, too, to learn that there are a wide variety of fruits and vegetables available in winter. Most people, wrongly, believe that nothing is growing in Japan during these cold months. Certainly, further north in Tohoku, there is some truth there, but from Saitama on down, the fields are alive with various greens and root crops, and many an orchard is bursting with fruit.

So, to get folks feeling brave, I'm going to list a few recipes for items found on vendor tables everywhere these days.

It seemed logical to start with yuzu, a beloved citrus found almost nowhere else, that is in full swing at the moment. There are a number of varieties, but yuzu is yuzu, and you can have a wonderfully delicious time with it no matter what form you see. Some look almost like mikans and are nearly orange-yellow in color. Others are a little bit bigger than a ping pong ball and are a vivid yellow. Still others are slightly larger than a softball, bright yellow, and highly textured. Those are heavy on pith and peel, but can still make a good marmalade.

Here are some recipes to get you started!

Yuzushu
One of easiest ways to make use of this lovely fruit is yuzushu. Based on the umeshu recipe, I simply substituted yuzu. The peel needs to be separated from the fruit and removed a few weeks in to lessen the bitter effect, but otherwise it is the same principle: put ingredients in jar and wait.

Yuzuhachimitsu
For those seeking a non-alcoholic beverage, this yuzu'd version of umehachimitsu might be just the ticket. Sweet, bitter, and tart, it is a little bit strange but still delicious. It is also possible to make candied peel out of this, although I believe I made marmalade with the leftover fruit.

Yuzu Marmalade
This recipe is a straight-up yuzu marmalade with no additions and represents my early years of marmalade making. It is a nice recipe, but it does require a fair bit of time. I recommend trying it at least once to compare, although the recipes below are a bit speedier.

Apple Yuzu Marmalade
Yuzu and apples cross paths for a time at the markets, although apples arrive and stay longer at the party. However, they make a nice pairing. I've also squeezed a cut yuzu over sliced apples to keep them from browning, and the flavor combination is delightful. This marmalade takes advantage of both and makes a nice gift to boot.

Yuzu Ginger Marmalade
Yuzu and ginger also make a great combination and also cross paths at the markets this time of year. I tend to use a fair bit of ginger for a zippy flavor in this marmalade, but you can suit your household tastes as you see fit. The ginger, I think, would also make a nice addition to the shu.

Candied Yuzu Peel
If you decide to make the yuzushu, you may end up wondering what to do with all that peel you remove. Well, so did I. I opted to make candied peel of the yuzu, which was labor intensive and ridiculously delicious.

Ramen
Dressing up those ramen packs is something we do at our house, and let me just say that it makes an otherwise tasty but slightly disgusting bowl of noodles into something wonderful. If a generous drizzle of yuzu were added to the bowl along with an assortment of fresh vegetables, it would be divine. Otherwise, you can go to Afuri or Zund-Bar, an Afuri affiliate of some kind, and enjoy the one placed before you. Here's an early, early piece about a first trip to Afuri, before they became an international thing.

Tsukemono a.k.a. Pickles
In winter, yuzu peel and/or slices are often slipped into the tsukemono jar for a little zing. The jar in the linked post is gone now, thanks to my office assistant, Frank. However, I recommend picking up one up (and keeping it away from your cat) for easy pickling!

Have a recipe to share or a suggestion? Send it along!! I'd love to add it to the list.